20th Century Fox Agreed To Distribute ‘Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter,’ But Why?

People love references to pop culture, the problem is, most of those references have a cheese-like expiration date and eventually become as forgettable as your best friend’s grandma’s name.

Like all things written on paper, comic books are declining in sales. They are read by thousands and seen by millions.

The Walking Dead and Wanted exceeded expectations, and while Scott Pilgrim vs. the World failed to soar at the box office, it remains a cult favorite of teens and 20-somethings.

Jonah Hex, also based on a comic also did poorly despite the casting of Megan Fox and Josh Brolin. But how do movies like Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter and Jonah Hex even get made?

Well it’s simple, the studios who distribute them see a dollar sign formula. Gore, a catchy title, and a certain self-aware humor that appeals to the hipster generation.

But how did we go from liking Scott Pilgrim to wanting to see Abraham Lincoln fight vampires on top of a moving train? It’s easy, many movie executives are as out of touch with reality as this story.

What’s worse is, Timur Bekmambetov, who also directed Wanted, keeps telling people to ‘forget that it’s about vampires, because it’s historically accurate.’

Then why the title? I know it’s based on Seth Grahame-Smith’s mostly unillustrated book, but this last-ditch Tim Burton-produced effort won’t be seen by me and many others because, despite the name, it appears to take itself too seriously.

Never go full retard,” unless your film is called Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter.

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